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Henry (Harry) Grove

First name:
Henry (Harry)
Family name:
Grove
Nationality:
England
Gender:
M
Was:
33 years
Date of birth:
1862-05-07
Place of birth:
Tulse Hill, England
Date of death:
1896-02-07
Place of death:
London, England

Memo(s)

   "What perfect style!" was one's exclamation on watching [Harry] Grove's game for the first time. He was indeed a player of infinite capacity though of very varying performance, who, to the deep regret of all who knew him - and their name was legion - passed away early in 1896, before he had completed his thirty-fourth year.

"I first met Grove in the year 1885 at Chiswick [Park, Middlesex, now Greater London] both in the handicap and in the penultimate round of the Open Singles, since known as the Middlesex Championships. In each encounter fortune inclined to my side. The last-mentioned match in particular was a very hotly contested one. All five sets were played, and each won by six games to four. Grove reached four game to two in the final set.

"The following year he won the Northern Championship, defeating Ernest Renshaw in the penultimate round by three sets to two - one of his best performances. He also scored a victory in the Chiswick Park singles this year, and his display against [Edward] L. Williams in the final round was of a very high class. His command of the ball in this match - the last, I think, that 'Teddy' played on grass - was truly remarkable. It was one of Grove's days and Williams stood no chance whatever against his opponent's placing. Well I remember the loser's exclamations as Grove's returns kept find the lines with extraordinary regularity and precision, first on one side, then on the other - 'Well, hang it, he can't go on doing this much longer'. But he went on doing it too long for 'Master Teddy' that day.

"This was an example of Grove at his best, at which times - they were frequent enough too - he was the equal of anybody. Unfortunately from his point of view he had also frequent off moods, when nothing would go right, and then a third- or fourth-rate man would stand a fair chance over this accomplished by unequal player.

"He had graduated in the Renshaw school, but, although when at the top of his game fully as brilliant as his great prototypes, he lacked their consistency. Yet even at his worst he was worth watching, so consummately easy and elegant was his style.

"His volleying powers were great; the stroke was made with great crispness - especially brilliant were his cross-volleys. And he played a strong game too from the baseline, the strokes from that position being severe and of the very low trajectory, perhaps lower than was altogether safe. But, although a most formidable opponent to any volleyer, he never seemed to feel quite at home when opposed to a good baseline player, more, I think, to lack of judgment, than to any defects of execution. Invariably, so it seemed to me, he came in on the wrong ball, thus, active though he was, offering his baseline adversary on such occasions the chance of passing him down either line. One stroke he would often attempt of which I never could see the utility - from his point of view. It was a sort of forehand slog, made apparently without rhyme or reason, and I always reckoned upon it as a safe fifteen to me, for in all the matches I played him I cannot remember that this stroke ever passed the net. Yet he must, I suppose, have scored with it at times, or he would scarcely have ventured to employ it.

"There was nothing remarkable in his service; it was just of medium pace and fair length. His backhand was admirably easy, elegant, and severe. In lasting power he was the equal of anybody. So good was his condition that he appeared to be able to reel off set after set with no sense of fatigue or loss of his fine touch, often playing with scarcely any intermission from morn to dewy eve. Like his brother-in-law, [Harry] S. Barlow, he was somewhat partial to unnecessary five-set matches. It was always a very great pleasure to meet him in a match. His geniality was on a par with his brilliancy of execution.

"Grove frequently visited the United States and India. On one of his first trips to the latter country he was accompanied by his friend and partner in Doubles, the late Charles Lacy-Sweet. On this occasion Grove won the Championship of Southern India for the second time. His compagnon de voyage in the previous year was that accomplished player, C.E. Farrer, with whom he also carried off the Doubles. It is sad to think that all three have joined the majority.

"At Wimbledon Dame Fortune always treated Grove in a very step-motherly fashion. It was his almost invariable fate to meet his conqueror in the second round of the All-Comers'. His nearest approach to the final was in 1887, when he - one of the last four - was beaten by [Herbert] F. Lawford by 3 sets to 1, the last two of these being advantage sets. The third set Grove should have won - he had already credited himself with the first - for on no less than five occasions he stood with a stroke of victory. Very brilliant too was the form he showed in 1888, in the second round, against [William] Renshaw. He second set of this match (which Renshaw won by 3 sets to 1) contained no fewer than 26 games - a record for Wimbledon, I believe.

"It was when partnering Grove in the Scottish Championship Doubles of 1887 that W. Renshaw met with the injury to his elbow which necessitated his temporary retirement from the game.

"Grove was also a good billiard player. He won the cue at Oxford in his first term.

Herbert Chipp (thanks to Mark Ryan)
  

Went to Oxford University, but probably did not pursue a profession. His father, Edward, was a merchant clothier and landowner. 32-year-old “Harry” married 21-year-old Stella Robins in November 1894 in Trinity Church, Upper Chelsea, London (they had no children). “Harry” had three older sisters and a younger brother, Philip (b. 1863), who also played some tennis. Cause of “Harry’s” death is not clear. (Mark Ryan)


Stats

Matches in database: 200
Victories in database: 118
Tournaments won in database: 15

Results

Men's singles
Round 1


Round 1


Round 1


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1


Round 2


Round 1


Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Quarterfinals


Round 1

Round 2

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 2


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Round 2

Quarterfinals
Grove, Henry (Harry) d. Wilson-Fox, Henry (6-2 4-6 5-6 6-2 6-0)

Semifinals
Chipp, Herbert d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (6-4 4-6 4-6 6-4 6-4)


Round 1

Semifinals


Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Quarterfinals


Round 2

Quarterfinals


Round 1


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Quarterfinals
Dwight, James d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (5-6 4-6 6-3 6-5 6-3)


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final

Challenge Round


Round 2


Round 2

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Preliminary Round


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Round 2

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final

Challenge Round


Challenge Round


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1
Murray , F. d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (2-6 6-8 11-9 8-6 6-4)


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Semifinals


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Challenge Round
Bowes-Lyon, Patrick d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (1-6 0-6 10-8 6-2 3-1 ret.)


Challenge Round


Round 1


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Round 2

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Quarterfinals


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Round 2


Quarterfinals


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1


Round 1
Baldwin, James d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (5-7 6-8 6-3 6-2 6-4)


Challenge Round


Round 1

Round 2

Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final
Grove, Henry (Harry) d. Baddeley, Wilfred (4-6 1-6 9-7 6-0 10-8)

Challenge Round
Ziffo, Andrew d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (4-6 6-3 1-6 9-7 6-4)


Round 1

Semifinals

Final


Round 1


Round 2

Quarterfinals


Quarterfinals


Round 1


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1


Round 2

Quarterfinals


Round 1

Round 2

Round 3


Round 2


Preliminary Round


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1


Round 1


Round 2


Round 2

Quarterfinals


Round 1
Grove, Henry (Harry) d. Fuller, D. (6-3 6-4 5-7 6-1)

Round 2


Round 1


Round 1

Quarterfinals


Round 1


Round 1


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Round 2


Quarterfinals

Semifinals

Final


Round 1

Round 2


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals
Palmer, Archdale d. Grove, Henry (Harry) (2-6 3-6 6-3 7-5 6-1)


Round 1


Round 1


Round 2


Round 2

Quarterfinals


Round 2


Round 1

Round 2


Round 2

Round 3


Round 1

Quarterfinals

Semifinals


Round 1



Family Links

Henry (Harry) Grove
is a brother of Philip Grove








Photo album Henry (Harry) Grove




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